About TLB

  • Philip Jessup proposed the idea of a transnational law course. His vision of the subject was broad, including public and private international law; state and non-state actors; business, administrative, and political affairs; as well as negotiation and litigation. Inspired by his idea, TLB is only constrained by its pursuit to address all law transcending national frontiers.

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April 22, 2007

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Piercing The Veil of Anonymity: What You Say On The Internet Can Be Used To Determine Your Moral Fitness to Practice Law:

» A Letter From UC Berkeley's Law Students About The UC Hastings Evacuation from Transnational Law Blog
UC Hastings was evacuated last week and is still on high alert as a result of a prank by a UC Berkeley law school student (see here). The UC Berkeley Boalt Hall Students Association has sent the following letter to the law students at UC Hastings: Apri... [Read More]

Comments

Wendy Jackson

Sorry T, just a quick comment--the continued use of the phrase "Collateral Damage" may be offensive to some, as it seemingly refers to those killed in the Columbine, Unabomber, and VT tragedies.

Travis Hodgkins

Wendy-- Please accept my deepest apologies if I have offended you by using the phrase "collateral damage", and I also apologize to anyone else that may be offended by the use of this phrase. I continued using this phrase in part to refer to the earlier post I did about Columbine and the Unabomber but also to refer to Alan Childress's use of the phrase in reference to the UC Berkeley student who ruined his career making a foolish comment on a discussion board.

The notion of "collateral damage" encapsulates harms that have occurred as a result of some other harm, and my use of it is in no way meant to slight the tragedy that occurred at Virginia Tech or any other tragedy. One of the aims of this post is to discuss an issue of great importance to law students (viz. passing the moral aptitude test for Bar admission) by discussing the mistake of another student. Hopefully, that is implicit in the post, but if it's not, I hope that this comment has helped to alleviate any confusion.

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